Thursday, August 10, 2017

Man sues Arrowhead Stadium over lack of security privateofficer.com

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Kansas City MO Aug 10 2017 A Kansas City man says that when he tried to break up a fight during a 2013 Chiefs game at Arrowhead Stadium, he was attacked because there were no security nearby to help.
In a civil trial this week in Jackson County Circuit Court, Adrien Caye’s lawyers are arguing that the crowds at Kansas City Chiefs home games have a history of being unruly, threatening and violent. Yet the team has failed to provide adequate security or crowd control at Arrowhead, they say in court documents.
The Chiefs deny the claims and are fighting them in court.
Instead of coming to help control an intoxicated and violent fan, stadium security was nowhere around, court documents say.
When Caye tried to intervene, he was sent cascading down a flight of concrete steps, shattering both wrists, he says in court documents to support the lawsuit he filed in 2014.
Caye attended the 3 p.m. home game Oct. 20, 2013 against the Houston Texans along with his fiancee, his father and other relatives. Halfway through the third quarter, Caye saw a commotion occurring in the stands nearby, he says in court documents.
Kent Steiniger, who attended the game with his wife, sat directly in front of Caye in the stadium’s upper level, and his family became the focal point of the action, Caye’s attorney, Ken McClain, said during opening arguments. Steiniger was initially named in the suit but later was dismissed from the lawsuit.
Steiniger appeared intoxicated; he hurt his wife and he fought with other fans around him, McClain said in court. Steiniger reportedly bulldozed his way through the stands toward Caye and his family. Steiniger pushed and shoved other fans out of their seats and into the aisles, McClain said.
Caye stood up and tried to shield his family. As Steiniger approached his row, Caye tried to calm him down by placing his hand on Steiniger’s shoulder and tried to stop him, McClain said.
Suddenly, Steiniger grabbed Caye by the wrist and flipped him over, McClain said. Steiniger allegedly shoved Caye, sending him tumbling down 20 concrete stairs. Steiniger reportedly landed on top of Caye and punched him several times.
Caye sustained two broken wrists, court documents say. Both of his hands were bent back at unnatural angles. Caye sat on the stadium stairs and asked several people to help or call an ambulance, but no one responded.
No security guards or other authorities were there to help him, the lawsuit says.

“The patrons of Kansas City Chiefs’ games are provided with alcohol and an environment exists in which confrontation, assaults, and other related behaviors take place,” according to the lawsuit.
Fritz Riesmeyer, attorney for the Chiefs, said during opening arguments that the team has hundreds of off-duty Kansas City police officers and deputies with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office as well as a private security company at each home game.
Fans who find themselves feeling threatened by unruly and potentially abusive fans can easily alert stadium security or workers who staff safety booths throughout Arrowhead, Riesmeyer told jurors.

The trial is expected last more than a week.
The Kansas City Star

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